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Walker has yet to pardon, set up new advisory board

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Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 12:00 am

MADISON, Wis. -- Republican Gov. Scott Walker hasn't issued a pardon or set up the next version of the state's Pardon Advisory Board, refusing to exercise one of his office's most expansive powers to restore felons' former rights.

Walker spokesman Cullen Werwie said Monday the governor has suspended the pardon program but offered no explanation beyond "because he has made the decision not to grant any pardons at this time." Werwie didn't have any numbers on how many people have requested a pardon, saying only that the office has received "a bunch."

Walker's lack of action stands in stark contrast to his predecessor. Democrat Jim Doyle pardoned nearly 300 people during his eight years in office, with roughly a third coming during the last three-and-a-half months of his tenure. Tough-on-crime Republicans ripped Doyle then, saying he abused his pardon powers.

Former Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson granted 62 pardons from 1994 through 1999 and none in 2000, his last full year in office. His successor, Republican Scott McCallum, issued two dozen pardons from 2001 through 2002 before he lost his job to Doyle.

Senate Minority Leader Chris Larson, D-Milwaukee, said Walker is shirking his duties.

"Maintaining an effective and fair pardon process is an important fail-safe to an imperfect judicial system," Larson said. "Governor Walker's failure to appoint members to the pardon review board raises questions about his commitment to a fair and just court system."

But granting pardons offers few political benefits for governors, especially conservative ones who want to appear tough on crime, said Charles Franklin, a visiting professor of law and public policy at Marquette University.

"Where is there something to be gained through pardons?" Franklin said. "Maybe the governor simply doesn't see that as important. I don't see that there's a political price to be paid for not pardoning people."

© 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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